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Famous Pastry Shops Around the World

Famous Pastry Shops Around the World


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A trip to any of these extravagant pastry shops is a treat

Bite into a “zumbaron” at Adriano Zumbo in Australia or taste possibly the best cardamom bun in Sweden at Valhallabageriet.

The moment you step in, sweet smells of sugar and chocolate overwhelm you as you stare in awe at glass cases displaying rows of colorful treats intricately designed that look almost too pretty to eat — almost. An éclair, sprinkled with just the right amount of powdered sugar and filled with green tea custard, is set before you — a pretty pastry to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Famous Pastry Shops Around the World (Slideshow)

A moment like this can be had at Patisserie Sadaharu AOKI in Tokyo, where Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki makes cross-cultural creations, like macarons filled with Earl Gray cream and “Japanese smores” made of marshmallow cream, thin chocolate wafers, and azuki red beans.

Sticky cinnamon buns, torte cakes, salted caramel cronuts, banana split waffles — are you drooling yet? These are just a few of the elaborate pastries made at some of the world’s most famous pastry shops. And every one is well worth the long-distance trip.

At Adriano Zumbo in Australia, you can taste Zumbo’s 40 shades of zumbarons — what pastry chef Adriano Zumbo calls his colorful macarons — including, you better believe it, a “Vegemite on Toast” zumbaron. Pierre Poilâne’s pâtisserie (the name for a French pastry shop) in Paris, is famous for its “Punitions,” — small, butter cookies that pair perfectly with tea or coffee. Valhallabageriet, a small pastry shop with seating for just about eight people, is said to serve possibly the best cardamom bun in Sweden that is baked with sweet dough, flavored with fresh ground cardamom, and smothered with butter and cream.

For someone who melts over all things sweet and sugary, a trip to any of these pastry shops is a treat. Read on for more famous, extravagant, sweets-filled pastry shops around the world.

Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal's assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.


World's most tempting pastry shops

Patisserie Sadaharu AOKI, Tokyo: Your sweet tooth is in for a cultural treat at Patisserie Sadaharu AOKI, where Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki makes cross-cultural creations, like éclairs filled with green-tea custard macarons filled with Earl Gray cream and "Japanese smores" made of marshmallow cream, thin chocolate wafers and azuki red beans. Displayed in glass cases full of rows of colorful macaroons, cakes and elaborately decorated pastries, Sadaharu's desserts are almost too extravagant to eat. (Photo: Flickr/LAXFlyer)

The moment you step in, sweet smells of sugar and chocolate overwhelm you as you stare in awe at glass cases displaying rows of colorful treats intricately designed that look almost too pretty to eat — almost. An éclair, sprinkled with just the right amount of powdered sugar and filled with green tea custard, is set before you — a pretty pastry to satisfy your sweet tooth.

A moment like this can be had at Patisserie Sadaharu AOKI in Tokyo, where Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki makes cross-cultural creations, like macarons filled with Earl Gray cream and "Japanese smores" made of marshmallow cream, thin chocolate wafers, and azuki red beans.

Sticky cinnamon buns, torte cakes, salted caramel cronuts, banana split waffles — are you drooling yet? These are just a few of the elaborate pastries made at some of the world's most famous pastry shops. And every one is well worth the long-distance trip.

At Adriano Zumbo in Australia, you can taste Zumbo's 40 shades of zumbarons — what pastry chef Adriano Zumbo calls his colorful macarons — including, you better believe it, a "Vegemite on Toast" zumbaron. Pierre Poilâne's pâtisserie (the name for a French pastry shop) in Paris is famous for its "Punitions" — small butter cookies that pair perfectly with tea or coffee. Valhallabageriet, a small pastry shop with seating for just about eight people, is said to serve possibly the best cardamom bun in Sweden, baked with sweet dough, flavored with fresh ground cardamom, and smothered with butter and cream.

For someone who melts over all things sweet and sugary, a trip to any of these pastry shops is a treat. Read on for more famous, extravagant, sweets-filled pastry shops around the world.

Adriano Zumbo, Australia

Taste 40 shades of "zumbarons," — what pastry chef Adriano Zumbo calls his colorful macarons — including, yes, a "Vegemite on Toast" zumbaron -- at Adriano Zumbo, where the décor is modeled after Adriano's philosophy on food: that it should be fun, textural, and appealing to the eye and should taste incredible. His decorative pastries like passion fruit tarts, salted caramel "zonuts," coconut cream lamingtons and apple maple cheesecake can't be beat.

Bear's Paw Bakery, Canada

When it's cold outside, Bear's Paw Bakery, tucked away in the mountains, serves warming pastries, including sticky cinnamon buns, chocolate raspberry and apple cranberry muffins, and cookies and croissants. Bear's Paw is known for its Granny Smith apple pie and carrot cake.

The wait staff at this historic pastry shop, which dates back to 1786, still serves its iconic desserts, including candied violets, cat tongues and the Eduard-Sacher torte cake from a glass display. Tea biscuits, fruitcakes, chocolates and other desserts can be purchased in decorative boxes or ordered to-go from Demel's downstairs pastry shop.

Founded by Max Fichtman and Oded Brenner, Max Brenner invites you to "experience [their] chocolate love story." Everything on the menu, from fresh fruit and pastries to waffles and cookies, is topped with layers upon layers of melted chocolate. Whether it's the chocolate hazelnut milkshakes, banana split waffles or the s'mores fondue, these treats are likely to make you drool.

Pastelería Mila, Colombia

Nearly every treat at Pastelería Mila is covered in smooth, creamy chocolate — from brownies to pancakes to cupcakes to pies. One of its signature desserts is a thick brownie topped with a glob of dulce de leche drizzled off the sides. And Melia's hot chocolate, served with steamed milk and a few chocolate bars thrown in, might be the best cup of hot chocolate you've ever had.

Traditionally a bread bakery, Panella also bakes gourmet Italian pastries — some of which aren't made anywhere else — including pistachio cream-filled pastries, sfogliatella, brioche and mixed berry muffins.

Patisserie Sadaharu AOKI, Tokyo

Your sweet tooth is in for a cultural treat at Patisserie Sadaharu AOKI, where Japanese pastry chef Sadaharu Aoki makes cross-cultural creations, like éclairs filled with green-tea custard macarons filled with Earl Gray cream and "Japanese smores" made of marshmallow cream, thin chocolate wafers and azuki red beans. Displayed in glass cases full of rows of colorful macaroons, cakes and elaborately decorated pastries, Sadaharu's desserts are almost too extravagant to eat.

Pierre Poilâne's pâtisserie (the name for a French pastry shop), is famous for its "Punitions," — small butter cookies that pair perfectly with tea or coffee — which are named after a game Poilâne's grandmother used to play with him when he was young. While these cookies are a classic treat, Poilâne's apple tarts, spoon biscuits, jams, gingerbread and other sweets shouldn't be overlooked.

Valhallabageriet, Sweden

Valhallabageriet, a small pastry shop with seating for just about eight people, is said to serve possibly the best cardamom bun — called "kardemummabulle" in Swedish — in Sweden. The traditional breakfast pastry is baked here with sweet dough, flavored with fresh ground cardamom, and smothered with butter and cream.


Best Sweet Pies Around the World

Sweet pie is one of the most favorite desserts in most parts of the world. Almost every country has its own traditional pie, which is an integral part of a nation’s culture. Making pies is most often associated with a warm family atmosphere, and that is why pies are so popular. Pies are also an association with the holidays and the time we spend with our loved ones.

Sweet pies can be stuffed with various fruits, but also simply topped with sweet cream. What is characteristic of most pies are the crispy crusts that make pies such a specific dessert.

The most famous pie is American apple pie. However, what you may not know is that there are many other unusual pies from all parts of the world. Through this text, we will mention several pies that left the strongest impression on us.

You will see that the pie can look quite different than you can imagine. So keep reading and step into the world of the most beautiful sweet pies.

7 Most Beautiful Sweet Pies From Different Countries of the World

1. Saskatoon Berry Pie (Saskatoon, Canada)

Saskatoon Berry Pie is a traditional Canadian pie, which is stuffed with Saskatoon berry filling (resembling blueberries). Even the ancient inhabitants of Canada once used Saskatoon berries in their diet (they grow and dry them for storage during the winter). The city of Saskatoon, located in Canada, is named after the Saskatoon berries. Saskatoon berries are protected by the “Slow Food” initiative.

Saskatoon berry pie is made from flour, butter, eggs, and Saskatoon berries. This pie is offered by many pastry shops in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

2. Banoffee Pie (Jevington, England)

Banoffee pie is one of the most famous pies originating from England. It is made of cream, banana, and caramel on top. The base of the pie can be made of crispy dough or ground biscuits. The name of the pie was created by combining the words “banana” and “toffee.” Banoffee pie has become very popular all over the world. For this reason, it can be found in most pastry shops around the world. If you want to try Banoffee pie, you should order it from the best online cake shop in Dubai.

3. Mummentaart (Luxembourg, Europe)

Mummentaart is a traditional apple pie originating from Luxembourg. The dough from which the pie is made consists of flour, butter, quark, salt, and water. The apples for the filling are finely chopped, then sprinkled with sugar, cinnamon, lemon juice, and finally sprinkled with raisins. Mummentaart pie is served hot or cold, combined with whipped cream and fresh fruit.

4. Pardulas (Italy, Europe)

Pardulas are miniature pies, which traditionally originate from Italy (the island of Sardinia). The name of these pies depends on the area in which they are made. So, for example, in the southwest of Sardinia, they are called Pardulas. In contrast, in the vicinity of Nuoro (western Sardinia), they are called Casadinas. Pardulas are made from semolina, ricotta, lard, eggs, sugar, saffron, and grated lemon peel. The tradition of making Pardulas is mostly related to Easter. It is best to serve them warm, sprinkled with powdered sugar.

5. Haupia Pie (Hawaii, USA)

Haupia pie is originally from Hawaii. The pie consists of three layers: a crispy crust, a layer of haupia (coconut pudding in the form of jelly), and finally a thick layer of chocolate pudding. The pie is usually topped with whipped cream and can be found in almost all pastries in Hawaii (as a local dessert).

Sweet pies are one of the favorite desserts in the world

6. Karpouzopita (Greece, Europe)

Karpouzopita is a traditional pie that originates from the Greek island of Milos. It consists of watermelon, sugar, flour, cinnamon, thyme honey (a local product from the island of Milos), and olive oil. The pie’s name is derived from the Greek words “carpouzi,” which means watermelon, and “pita,” which means pie. Walnuts or raisins are added to Karpouzopita in some recipes.

7. Sugar Pie (Quebec, Canada)

Sugar pie is a very popular delicacy in many countries (Belgium, France, USA, and Quebec in Canada). The pie is made without the top, and the filling consists of a combination of sugar, cream, butter, maple syrup, and a little salt. The aroma of vanilla is usually added to the filling. There are variations in the sugar pie recipe. For example, the pie is made with more filling in Indiana than in other parts of the world.

There are many sweet pies, but these 7 are definitely our favorites. For a more extensive list of sweet pies, see the following link: https://www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/most-popular-pies.

Sweet pies are the best thing that humankind has invented when it comes to desserts. If you find yourself in a country that we mentioned in the text, do not miss the opportunity to try the traditionally made pie. You will enjoy it!


Pastry Salvatore de Riso and his Lemon Delight

There’s a reason that the Amalfi Coast is on the top of any respectable wedding planner’s list –as one of the world’s most romantic and evocative places, it’s no wonder that so many couple want to get married here. For those who don’t know, it’s the stretch of coastline that runs alongside the Gulf of Salento, extending from Positano to Vietri sul Mare.

The director Roberto Rossellini fell in love with the area in the mid 1940s. “Those who live on the Coast are mad, they’re drunk on sunshine,” he often said, “but they possess the strength of imagination.” And his enthusiasm spread to the Hollywood stars of the era, who flocked to the area, bringing the region into the collective consciousness.

This land has also been declared a Unesco World Heritage Site. And while it’s highly unlikely that one of the reasons for this decision was Salvatore De Riso’s famous “la Delizia al limone” dessert, it very well could have been. This irresistible dish, an authentic culinary manifesto of the region, is the stuff that legends are made of: created in 1989, by a then-very-young Sal, (who is today the 2010/2011 Italian Pastry Champion according to the Accademia Maestri Pasticceri Italiani) it is still his most requested dish – along with the pear and ricotta tart.

A stop at his pastry shop in Minori is practically obligatory, thanks to the magic of the dish that’s managed to win over palates as divergent as Prince Rainier of Monaco and Pope John Paul II. “La Delizia” is one of those universally-loved creations: sweet, but not too-sweet, soft but with varying consistencies that keeps it interesting, apparently light and airy but with an extraordinary perfume, it’s like poetry on a plate.

And for the first time, this signature recipe of one of Italy’s most renowned pastry chefs, is available in English, a FDL exclusive. So what is all the fuss about?

Well, imagine a small, snowy dome – evoking the shape of a delicate breast -- topped with a dollop of ribbed cream and then, a thinly sliced strip of lemon rind. The dome is made from a special Pan di Spagna, or Génoise cake, which literally melts on your tongue with a pleasing sour hint from the ground almonds in the batter. The spoon encounters no resistance at entry, the centre of this delicate cake encompasses a white lemon cream filling, so intense that it will make your eyes close automatically.

Bringing the spoon to your lips, the scent will bring you to a lemon grove hovering over the Gulf of Sorrento and the scent is exactly as it would be were you to pick a fruit and bring it to your nose, breathing in the smell from the exact point it was taken from the branch. Again, to best explain this fragrance, you also have to add a bit of freshly-washed laundry hung out to dry under the Amalfi sunshine.

The filling of limoncello (the traditional lemon-based liqueur from Amalfi) doesn’t carry with it the harshness of alcohol that can be found in some liqueur-filled sweets, but serves as a counterweight to the fullness of the cream, although there’s only a small amount of it. The job of this lemon cream filling is to infiltrate into every corner of the cake.

Despite his success, Sal De Riso hasn’t lost his characteristic modesty. Even after television made him famous in his native Italy, even after the attention he received in 1999 for having created the largest cake in the world on the anniversary of Alfred Hitchcock’s birthday (a pyramid of chocolate weighing 500 kilos, decorated with 300 sugar-glazed images of scenes from the director’s films).

His books carefully and precisely describe his dishes, without keeping any ingredients or steps secret or mysterious. His generosity is that of a true master, one who isn’t jealous of his talent. If, when in Minori, you don’t see him rushing among the tables of his seaside pastry shop, it’s most likely because he’s hard at work in his laboratory – a one thousand square metre space in a nearby village called Tramonti.

As De Riso says, «All of my products, whether sweet or savoury, are a tribute to my land and to all of Southern Italy: the gold of the Amalfi lemons, the Annurca apples, the Giffoni hazlenuts, the Tramonti ricotta, the citrus fruits from Campania, the tomatoes from San Marzano and extra-virgin olive oil.»

If you don’t have immediate plans to pay a visit to this region of Italy – and to watch Sal in person as he creates and serves his dishes – you can still enjoy his signature dish, “Delizia al limone”, which has conquered the world: it can be found at Harrods in London, as well as other specialty gourmet shops around the world. For a complete list, check here.


3) NATA LISBOA – The World Needs Nata (Rua da Prata, 78)

Right in Lisbon downtown arrived this new project, to produce freshly cooked custart tarts. They have just opened in 2011, and have now several shops around the world using this brand, using their franchise system. They are not old, but why do you need something old, when the recipe is absolutely tasty ? Have been there several times and is one of my favorites. Always warm and freshly cooked, and right in downtown.


Best Confectionery Shops & Cafes in Budapest to try traditional Hungarian desserts

You can still find a few excellent traditional Hungarian confectionery shops and cafes in Hungary where you can not only enjoy delightful cakes and sweets but an elegant and royal-like atmosphere.

While each of these traditional cafes and confectioneries is a must-try in Budapest you should also visit some of the more modern places especially if you’re vegan or you’re on a special diet.

Gerbaud Cafe – Probably the most famous Hungarian cafe and confectionery is Gerbaud Cafe. Here you can enjoy some of the best Hungarian desserts in an elegant atmosphere right in the center of Budapest. Gerbaud is open since 1858.

Daubner confectionery – Daubner is another world-famous confectionery opened by Daubner Bela in 1901. You can try here excellent cakes and all kinds of Hungarian desserts as well as more modern and unique delights.

Ruszwurm Confectionery – is a lesser-known Confectionery in Budapest, but it has a fine history and mouth-watering delights. You can find this gorgeous historic Confectionery in the Buda Castle. They first opened in 1827 and they still serve some of the best traditional Hungarian desserts in the country.

Zila café and Krisztina confectionery – You can find this elegant Cafe & confectionery a bit further from the center but it is so worth going the extra mile. You can have here a fine dinner and then try some of the best desserts in Hungary.

Auguszt confectionery – Is another lesser-known treasure in Budapest. They have two confectioneries in Budapest, one in Buda and one in Pest. The original confectionery opened in Buda in 1870. No matter which Auguszt confectionery you visit you’ll surely enjoy some of the best Hungarian desserts of your life.

Strudel Hugó – You can find this little shop in the center of Budapest in the historic Jewish District. Here you can find all kinds of yummy strudels at a pretty good price.

Szamos Gourmet House – Szamos has many shops all around Budapest and Hungary but Szamos Gourmet House is the most beautiful. You can try here delicacies made with the famous Szamos marzipan.


Sfogliatelle of Naples

It’s worth a trip to Naples if you love to eat, but especially if you have a sweet tooth. The secret to the city’s famous pastries lies in the combination of textures: flaky crust, a bite of fruit, and soft cream, best when enjoyed warm and fresh out of the oven. And you cannot leave Naples without sampling the granddaddy of Neapolitan pastry—sfogliatella.

“My family based their entire future on sfogliatella,” Ulderico Carraturo tells me. Carraturo’s family’s pastry shop, L’Antica Pasticceria Carraturo, was founded by Ulderico’s direct ancestor, Pietro, in 1837, near the old Naples city gate known as Porta Capuana. Today, the family continues to turn out this distinctive Neapolitan tradition with pride, in their location just steps away from the Napoli Centrale train station.

Sfogliatelle, literally “little leaves” in the plural form, are made by rolling out dough and forming it into a log, then trimming the ends so that the layers separate when baked, creating flaky “leaves.” Sfogliatelleare filled with cream and topped with fruit and a dusting of powdered sugar.

Like this article? Don't miss "29 things you must do in Naples."

Today, sfogliatella stands chief among a group of Neapolitan pastries that have brought the city fame as a center for sweet treats. These include:

Baba au rhum:What’s not to love about a yeast cake soaked in rum syrup? This traditional dessert may be served plain or sweetened with cream, ricotta, or even Nutella.

Torta caprese:This flourless chocolate cake is a specialty of the island of Capri, just off the Neapolitan coast, and is usually made with almond flour and dusted with powdered sugar.

Zeppole di San Giuseppe:These fried or baked dough balls are typically stuffed with pastry cream, ricotta, or custard, and sometimes made with dried fruit. They are traditionally served on St. Joseph’s Day, March 19, which pays homage to this patron saint of pastry chefs.

But it’s sfogliatella, Carraturo tells me, that tops of the list of the Neapolitan pastry traditions. “Sfogliatelle, along with zeppole, have transcended the centuries and stand the test of time,” he says.

Over generations, different versions of sfogliatelle emerged, made with varying combinations of ricotta, pastry cream, eggs, flour, milk, and sugar. You can find infinite varieties made with almond, orange, and other flavors blended into the ricotta or pastry cream. Here are a few of the common varieties you will encounter in the region:

[Sfogliatella Santa Rosa]

Sfogliatella Santa Rosais considered by many to be the original recipe, and it often incorporates dried fruits like cherries or raisins, along with a little liqueur.

Sfogliatella riccia(curly) forms many layers that curl up as the pastry cooks.

Sfogliatella frolla(smooth) is a less time-consuming version that does not form the layers but preserves all the flavor.

Sfogliatella aragosta(lobster tail) resembles the curled tail of a crustacean and often incorporates a very sweet whipped cream.

Where did sfogliatellacome from? It’s complicated.

As soon as you begin to dig into the history of sfogliatella, you realize that its origins remain uncertain—and heavily contested.

One theory is that the Carmelite convent of Santa Croce di Lucca in Naples developed sfogliatella in the seventeenth century, and then the recipe traveled to the Amalfi Coast.

An opposing but more popularly accepted version is that the nuns of Santa Rosa convent in Conca dei Marini, on the Amalfi Coast, were adding lemon liqueur to their pastry cream when making a particular type of pastry around 1700. The nuns made the pastry with semolina flour, milk, dried fruit, and a little white wine, but the secret ingredient of the famous sfogliatella Santa Rosa turned out to be a lemon liqueur that the nuns were making on site. (Today, the convent has been converted into a luxury hotel overlooking the sea, and of course it serves limoncello and sfogliatella in its restaurant.)

It doesn’t take long to realize that pride and competition around Neapolitan pastry runs deep. “Sfogliatelle Santa Rosa,” Ulderico Carraturo tries to convince me, “is a poorer version” than the one that originated in Naples itself.

Other Neapolitan pastry-makers would beg to differ. According to legend, at the beginning of the 1800s Pasquale Pintauro, a Neapolitan innkeeper, managed to get the recipe for sfogliatella Santa Rosa, perhaps from an aunt who was a nun at the Santa Rosa convent. Pintauro expanded his inn into a pastry shop on the via Toledo and began serving the pastries, which took on a more shell-like form and enjoyed consistent success. For years, Pintauro and his family were famous for commercializing homemade sfogliatelle and other local pastries, and Neapolitans lined up outside the shop to try them.

Making sfogliatella

“Making sfogliatella is very laborious,” Carraturo tells me. “Today, unfortunately, commercially made, frozen sfogliatella is widespread in the stores. These versions have a higher percentage of flour, which means that the dough is drier and less digestible.”

So, what makes a good sfogliatella? Ulderico Carraturo is quick to give me an answer. “A passion for preserving tradition is at the foundation. You have to want to offer a genuine, authentic product to your customers. At the same time that we want to respect tradition, though, we also want to personalize our recipe so that we can offer something unique for our customers to enjoy.”

Several pastry shops around the city are famous for their production of traditional Neapolitan treats, including sfogliatellaand other pastries. These souvenirs won’t last enjoy them on site and these artisanal delights will undoubtedly remain a memorable part of your trip to Naples.

Just remember that sfogliatellais not only a tasty treat it’s a matter of family pride and tradition. “I’m happy to share what we do,” Ulderico Carraturo tells me, “primarily because I consider sfogliatellaan integral part of my family.”

Laura Morelli is an art historian and historical novelist with a passion for Italy. You can find her guidebook series, including Made in Naples & the Amalfi Coast, and Made in Italy, as well as her Venice-inspired historical novel, The Gondola Maker, in the Italy Magazine shop.


The Patisseries in Paris That Everyone’s Talking About

Nicolas Haelewyn’s caramel pastries at Karamel.

LAST JUNE AT an awards ceremony in Spain devoted to the “World’s 50 Best Restaurants,” Frenchman Cédric Grolet accepted the title of World’s Best Pastry Chef. The 33-year-old, a native of Auvergne west of Lyon, heads the pastry department at Paris’s Le Meurice hotel, overseeing a team of 30. As the summer progressed, Mr. Grolet watched his social-media profile blow up, his following on Instagram (@cedricgrolet) surging past a million. “For a pastry chef it’s tremendous,” he said, during a recent tour of the hotel’s jewel-box boutique that began selling his creations-to-go a year ago.

Mr. Grolet is best known for his hand-molded fruits, delicate facsimiles of peaches, apples, grapefruits and pears coated in crisp shells of white chocolate ganache with centers made of fruit compotes and gelées. Another popular pastry, his glossy Rubik’s Cube cake, features many-flavored cubes. Posting every new confection on social media has helped make him an internet sensation. “Every day I get offers through Instagram,” he said, “offers to travel, to speak, to open shops around the world.”

Mr. Grolet, who is on the road frequently, is the most prominent member of a new generation of marketing-savvy young pastry chefs in the French capital. All under 40, they’ve been shaking up the city’s sugary scene, using social media to raise their international profiles. These young chefs have greatly broadened the reach of some of the city’s most rarefied hotels, restaurants and pastry shops, with a flood of fans now coveting their work from afar.

At the Hôtel Ritz Paris, pastry chef François Perret, 38, treats his 115,000 or so Instagram followers to reinventions of classic French treats. Mr. Perret’s take on Proust’s beloved madeleine is the size of a plate, yet as light as a pillow. Its burnished exterior conceals not conventional butter cake but layers of whipped cream, toasted almonds and chestnut honey. “I wanted to make a truly imposing madeleine,” he said.

Fauchon, the gourmet food shop founded in 1886 on the Place de la Madeleine, has a long tradition of identifying future dessert stars, with macaron maestro Pierre Hermé and New York’s Cronut king, Dominique Ansel, among its alumni. Last year the company brought in 30-year-old François Daubinet to oversee its pastry department. A rebellious veteran of Hôtel Plaza Athenée, he hides sleeves of tribal tattoos under his chef’s whites. Mr. Daubinet recently introduced a peach éclair infused with a dash of Japanese plum vinegar. His take on Fauchon’s signature pastry, the Bisou Bisou, a mousse-filled confection shaped like a voluptuous mouth, has a hint of hot chile pepper in its strawberry center and a chocolate piercing in its lower lip. “I wanted to bring a bit more rock ’n’ roll to the house,” said Mr. Daubinet. The dessert debuted last fall at the new Fauchon Hotel that opened across from the flagship boutique.


More cakes named after places from England and the rest of the world

There are several other well known cakes that are named after the places that they originated from. Here&aposs a selection of those cakes a brief description of each one.

Chorley cakes. Chorley cakes originate from the small town of Chorley in Lancashire, England. Like the Eccles, which is a nearby town to Chorley, this cake is full of raisins. The only difference is in the pastry which is less flaky and more like a biscuit.

Tottenham sponge. The Tottenham Sponge comes from Tottenham in London, England. This is the same place as the famous football team Tottenham Hotspurs FC. This is a sponge cake topped with jam and occasionally sprinkled with desiccated coconut flakes just like the London Cheese Cake. This is a rare cake that is mostly found in local bakeries around London.

Battenberg: Each square is said to represent a prince

Battenberg cakes. The Battenberg cake comes from the town of Battenberg in Germany. The cakes are famous for their light sponge decorated in a pink and yellow check pattern. Apricot jam separates each part of coloured sponge. The whole cake is then coated in marzipan. Battenberg cakes are said to have been baked to honour the marriage of one of Queen Victoria&aposs granddaughters to Prince Louis of Battenberg in 1884. Each of the four squares is said to represent one of the Battenberg princes.

Madeira cake. Madeira cake is a very plain type of cake that is named after the Portuguese island of Madeira. The sponge cake has a firm but light texture and is traditionally flavoured with lemon. Butter or jam is often spread onto slices of the cake before they are eaten.

Belgian buns comes from Belgium. They are made from a very sweet yeast dough and contain sultanas. This is then topped with fondant icing and half a glazed cherry. The buns are very sweet and taste great with a cup of hot tea.

Danish pastries havve a moist, chewy and quite a heavy pastry. There are several varieties and shapes. The simplest is the Fruit Danish, which is a swirl of pastry with raisins. The Custard Danish, The Apricot Danish and the Apple Danish come in different shapes. These flavours are shaped by folding two corners of a square of pastry and having them meet in the middle.


ATHENS

The subject of frequent arguments over who actually invented it, baklava has a history as multilayered as the flaky dessert itself.

The story may actually go all the way back to the 8th century BCE and the Assyrians, who layered bread dough with chopped nuts and honey and baked the result – a kind of proto-baklava – in wood-burning ovens. Perhaps carried by the winds of trade, different versions of this ancient dessert appeared on Greece’s shores a few centuries later. The 3rd-century-CE Deipnosophistae (“Banquet of the Learned”) – sometimes referred to as the oldest surviving cookbook – provides the recipe for gastrin, aka Cretan “Glutton Cake,” a sweet that also seems to presage the arrival of baklava as we know it. The instructions, attributed to Chrysippus of Tyana, one of the leading dessert experts of antiquity, calls for turning various chopped nuts, boiled honey and poppy and sesame seeds into a paste which is then spread between two sheets of thin, rectangular dough. At a certain point, ancient Greek cooks started using thinner sheets of pastry, better known as phyllo – Greek for “leaf” – getting closer to today’s baklava.

But it was without a doubt the Ottomans who raised the recipe to new heights in the palace kitchens and disseminated the sweet even further – now, baklava can be found in the Balkans, the eastern Mediterranean, the Middle East and North Africa.

As with most recipes, success lies in the ingredients: good-quality nuts, high-quality aromatic butter, a well-blended syrup, fresh spices and fine pastry. Most traditional Greek baklava recipes call for almonds and/or walnuts, cinnamon and clove, clarified butter, phyllo kroustas (the thin Greek pastry) and syrup made with honey. Sometimes orange peel or juice is added to the syrup for extra flavor. Although pistachio nuts are very popular in Greece, they are seldom used in Greek baklava, but are common in Turkish, Lebanese and many Middle Eastern recipes.

In many parts of Greece they give local names to variations of baklava, such as masourakia from Chios, zournadakia from Crete, samousades from Lakonia, pourakia from Rhodes or baklavou from Lesbos. Many of these are traditionally offered at engagement celebrations, weddings or even on Christmas and at New Year’s for good luck. There is also another folk legend associated with the making of baklava in Greece: Some say it is supposed to be made with 33 phyllo layers as a reference to the length of Christ’s life.

In Greece, baklava is sold in most bakeries and pastry shops around the country, even in supermarkets. In Athens, our favorite is undoubtedly made by the legendary Belle Vue, a 41-year-old pastry shop in Nea Smyrni owned by two Greek families who used to be based in Istanbul. The pastry chef – or “technician,” as they call him – is considered one of the best in town. The aroma of sugar and butter prevails as you enter the shop, suddenly waking up your sweet tooth. Behind the sparkling-clean counter you can see the immaculate open workshop, where all the magic happens. It’s a simple, yet professional, old-fashioned workshop. Among all the different heavenly varieties of baklava they make, the Turkish-style baklava kuru stands out, made with pistachios from the island of Aegina, many layers of pastry, a combination of high-quality sheep’s and goat’s milk butter and a comparatively drier texture (“kuru” means dry in Turkish).

Also in Nea Smyrni, on a residential road, is Maxim. The Greek family that owns the shop also used to be based in Istanbul and moved to Athens and opened this business in 1983. The shop transports you to another time it’s quite small and modest but filled with an air of nostalgia, which is rare in most pastry shops nowadays. It seems like a grandmother wearing her slippers and a robe will emerge from the workshop in the back at any time. Maxim offers fewer pastry options, but everything is incredibly fresh, including the two types of baklava, one made with pistachios and another with walnuts – both delicious.

Palet, located in the southern suburb Kalamaki, is owned by the Kordelidis family, which used to own a small chocolate factory in Dolapdere, Istanbul. They moved to Athens in 1977 and opened the pastry shop a year later. Second-generation owner Maria Kordelidis keeps the quality of ingredients high and spreads her love and enthusiasm for what they’ve been making. A recent renovation has made the shop rather fancy and elegant, and a wide selection of desserts and enticing aromas emerge from the upstairs workshop. Among the traditional Turkish versions of baklava available – all fresh and delightful – the most popular one is called “Baklava Sultan,” stuffed with ground pistachios. It is prepared with a special technique so that the pastry gives the impression of raw dough rather than crispy layers of phyllo. To achieve that, it’s baked for less time than normal and is made with a thicker sugar syrup, which keeps it moistened and gives it a softer texture.

For a Greek version, try Metropolitikon in central Athens, near Syntagma Square. This third-generation family business opened in 1930 and is notable for its authentic Greek desserts. The amazing Yiannena-style baklava is made with chopped almonds rolled in two different types of pastry with a sugar-honey syrup. It also sells baklavou from Lesbos island many layers of thin pastry are alternated with layers of finely chopped almonds and soaked with pure honey and orange syrup.

Open since 1915, Afoi Asimakopouloi in Exarchia, another third-generation family-owned pastry shop, is famous for its homemade dairy products, especially its yogurt and butter. The extraordinary quality of that butter is evident in the Greek-style baklava sold here, one with almonds and one with walnuts, both deeply imbued with the fragrance of cinnamon and clove.

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