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Best Oven Roasted Ribs Recipes (Slideshow)

Best Oven Roasted Ribs Recipes (Slideshow)


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A collection of our best stick-to-your-ribs recipes

Low & Slow Oven Baked Ribs

This recipe is our favorite because it is so low-maintance but high in flavor. Its utilizes store bought barbecue sauce or whatever spice rub you desire. The emphasis then is not on the ingredients but, the process of baking the ribs on low heat for a good chunk of time. The great thing about this recipe is that you can play around with multiple flavors and come out with delicious ribs as long as you bake your ribs at 225 F degrees for 3.5 to 4 hours depending on whether your'e using baby back ribs or St. Louis style ribs.

Click here for a recipe for Low & Slow Oven Baked Ribs.

Need ideas for spice rubs? Click here to view our collection of Best Spice Rub Recipes.

Baked Baby Back Ribs with Lemon Confit Marinade

Dad’s Oven Baked Ribs

These ribs are messy, sticky, and the meat falls off the bone. This dish is not for the dainty. Rather, these ribs are for those who are OK with being a hot mess!

Dad's Oven Baked Ribs Recipe

Hawaiian BBQ Oven Baked Ribs

Honey Baked Ribs

We love this recipe because all the prep work can be done in advance so when you have company coming over, all you have to do is bake these ribs for two hours with very little babysitting and voila! You have an impressive, delicious meal!

Click here for a recipe for Honey Baked Ribs.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.


Indoor Ribs: Use This Recipe For Smoked Ribs When You Can’t Get Outside

Don’t have a smoker or a grill? Live in a condo or dorm? Waiting out a blizzard? Broken leg? This technique delivers tender, juicy indoor ribs with a flavor that might fool you into thinking it was cooked outdoors. This is the recipe that beat recipes by Alton Brown, Jaden Hair of Steamy Kitchen, and Chef John of All Recipes in a blind taste test by TheKitchn.com.

Hungry for more ribs recipes, tips, and techniques? Click here to download our ebook “Amazing Ribs Made Easy” $3.99 on Amazon (free Kindle app runs on all computers and devices). Or, get this book and others FREE as a member of the AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club. Click here to join.

In the summer of 2015 our friends, the wizards at ChefSteps.com, invited Chef Ryan and me to their kitchen/lab in Seattle to show them how we cook ribs outdoors. Then, in a friendly challenge, we made indoor ribs that taste like ribs cooked outdoors. Watch the video above to see what happened.

They started their indoor ribs sous vide, a method of gently cooking in a vacuum pack in a hot water bath and then finishing them in the oven. We baked ours entirely inside in the oven, at first wrapped in foil, then nekkid.

The results? We agreed that our flavor was better. We agreed their meat was slightly juicier. We also agreed ours tasted more outdoorsy because we marinated the ribs for a bit in dilute liquid smoke. Both teams used a bit of Prague Powder #1 in their rub. PP#1 is a curing salt that gives hot dogs, corned beef, ham, bacon, and other cured meats their pink tinge. Both teams got a faux smoke ring from it. If you have a sous vide setup, instead of using foil as we did, do as they did and cook the ribs sous vide for five hours at 165 ° F, and then dry roast at 225 ° F for two hours. Here’s a video of the results.

Now a word on liquid smoke. BBQ snobs turn up their noses at the stuff because they get smoke in their cooker. What happens is smoke comes off combusting wood and condenses on cool meat. Pretty simple. Well that’s how liquid smoke is made. Wood is burned, it condenses on cool metal, and then it is bottled. Pretty much the way they make whiskey. So next time you run into a snob who starts to rant about liquid smoke, snatch that bourbon from their hand.