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Celebrate Citrus Season

Celebrate Citrus Season


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Join me in celebrating citrus season. Oranges and grapefruit are in full season right now and we need to take advantage of the amazing zing citrus can bring to our diet.

The orange is the perfect snack because it does not need to be washed and is travel friendly. All fruit in this family, like Clementines and Tangelos, are great to take to the ballpark, on a bike ride or can be used as a rejuvenating snack after working out because they are hydrating and full of antioxidants to boost your immune system and keep your skin healthy.

The Ruby Red Grapefruit is one of the most powerful fruits on the planet. It is loaded with Vitamin C and Lycopene, which fights disease and fatigue, and is fantastic when added to a variety of recipes.

Try these two zesty recipes to add some fantastic flavor to your diet and pick up some citrus to keep handy for a morning booster or afternoon snack!

Tip: At the store, choose citrus by a firm, deep or brightly colored skin.

Photo by Christin Urso

Ruby Red Grapefruit and Shrimp Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 7 minutes
Total Time: 17 minutes

Servings: 2

Photo by Christin Urso

Ingredients:

1 tbsp. Canola oil
1 lb. large pre-cooked shrimp, peeled
1 Grapefruit, peeled/segments
Green lettuce for 4 (I like butter lettuce)
1 large carrot, cut in matchsticks
1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
2 tbsp. fresh OJ
1 tbsp. sesame oil (or light olive oil)
¼ teaspoon chili flakes
2 tbsp. crushed almonds (or peanuts)

Photo by Christin Urso

Directions:

1. Heat oil in skillet/medium-high.

Photo by Christin Urso

2. Add shrimp and brown for 2 minutes on each side.
3. In large bowl, toss grapefruit, carrot and red pepper. In small bowl whisk together orange juice, sesame oil and chili flakes.
4. Add this dressing to salad. Top with shrimp and almonds. Enjoy!

Grapefruit Salsa Fish Tacos

Prep Time: 12 minutes
Cook Time: 8 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

1 Ruby Red Grapefruit, divided into segments
1 peeled and sliced avocado
¼ cup chopped cilantro
Juice of one lime
1 lb. fillet of cod/halibut
8 corn tortillas
Thinly sliced red cabbage or lettuce
Cooking spray

Directions:

1. In large bowl, toss grapefruit, avocado, cilantro and lime juice. Salt to taste.
2. Add chopped jalapeno if you like it spicy.

3. Spray frying pan with cooking spray and lightly cook fish fillets on medium heat (four minutes per side). Stuff tortillas with fish and grapefruit/avocado mixture.
4. Enjoy!

The post Celebrate Citrus Season originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Winter Citrus to Celebrate

Just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean there is a lack of fruit available at your grocery store. Check out what citrus has to offer your dinner table this season!

Citrus

Of course oranges, lemons and limes have a permanent place in the produce aisle, but our citrus choices expand greatly during the month of January and through the late winter months: easy-to-peel mandarin oranges (sometimes called Clementines), ruby red grapefruit, marble-sized kumquats, fragrant Meyer lemons, scarlet-fleshed blood oranges and juicy Key limes are just some of the citrus fruits at their prime right now.

The challenge of choosing citrus is that you can’t always tell the quality of the fruit inside simply by looking at its outer peel. But, in general, choose fruit that’s heavy for its size and evenly colored with rind that is glossy and firm with no signs of shriveling. Citrus keeps for up to two weeks when stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Fresh oranges, mandarins and grapefruit segments make delicious additions to salads – try any of them with fresh arugula tossed in a vinaigrette made with the juice of the citrus you’re using. And the minced zest is a great way to add intense citrus flavor to foods. Simply remove the colored outer layer of peel with a zesting tool or a vegetable peeler, taking care not to remove the bitter white pith underneath, then mince the zest with a knife before adding to salad dressings, cookie dough or cake batter.


Watch the video: Citrus Season Is Here. Sunkist - November 2019


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